Our sensors detect…

Our local sensors detect:

  • Continuing reaction to the Dragon Con Awards
  • Galaxy Quest sequel — Is it a go or not?

Long Range Sensors Detect:

  • Early Mars bombardment – Precursor to life on Mars?
  • Trigger for Milky Way’s youngest supernova identified
  • Long-Ago Supernovae Littered Earth
  • Observing: This Week’s Sky at a Glance, April 8 – 16

Our local sensors detect:

  • Continuing reaction to the Dragon Con Awards: Puppies, both sad and rabid, are declaring a victory and predicting the end of the Hugos. I don’t understand why they are so set on destroying something they claim not care about.  And why do they persist in claiming the Hugos are “fixed” in some way by a cabal? File 770 continues to compile the comments, pro and con. I don’t know Sean O’Hara , but he makes  valid points, starting with “What the World Needs Now Is Another Sci-Fi Award Like I Need a Hole in My Head”
  • Galaxy Quest sequel –– Is it a go or not? Two actors from Galaxy Quest commented on the proposed sequel, one claiming it is off because of the passing of Alan Rickman, the other claiming it is on in spite of the huge hole left by Rickman’s passing. I think too much time has passed.  Read More

Long Range Sensors Detect:

  • Early Mars bombardment – Precursor to life on Mars? The bombardment of Mars some 4 billion years ago by comets and asteroids as large as West Virginia likely enhanced climate conditions enough to make the planet more conducive to life, at least for a time, said a new University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder) study.Read More
  • Trigger for Milky Way’s youngest supernova identified: The stellar explosion occurred when two white dwarfs collided. Understanding type Ia supernovae causes more precisely will give astronomers greater insight into the expansion rate of the universe. Read More
  • Long-Ago Supernovae Littered Earth: Roughly 2 million years ago, as the human ancestor homo erectus was descending from the trees, two supernovae exploded nearby and showered Earth with debris.  This article describes the investigation into these supervovae. Near the end, and in a comment afterwards, the question of the effect this may have had on human evolution is raised.  Read More
  • Observing Highlights — This Week’s Sky at a Glance, April 8 – 16: Mercury makes its best dusk appearance this year, and the moon will occult Aldeberran.  Mercury is the most difficult planet to view. It is faint, in the city binoculars may be required. Also, it is very low to the horizon, so you need a good sight line to the west. Further details and finder chart here.